Hymn to Buddha

Using the Buddha’s teachings to preserve and enhance our well-being, as we engage with the world
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Nicholas
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Hymn to Buddha

Post by Nicholas »

Although the author was a Hindu convert to Buddhism, and his Guru was Aryadeva, a Mahayana disciple of Nagarjuna, his Sanskrit Dharma poetry was revered by all Buddhists and many Hindus. At any rate, here is link to an English translation of the about 150 verses:

http://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh360_Dhammik ... Buddha.pdf
Dhamma is against the stream of common thought, deep, subtle, difficult, delicate, unseen by passion’s slaves cloaked in the murk of ignorance. Vipassī Buddha
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Nicholas
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Re: Hymn to Buddha

Post by Nicholas »

A few verses from it:
No faults in any way are found in him;
All virtues in every way dwell in him.

To go to him for refuge, to sing his praise,
to do him honour and to abide in his Dharma
is proper for one with understanding.

The only Protector,
his faults are gone without residue.
The All-knowing One,
his virtues are present without fail.

Even the most spiteful man
cannot with justice find fault
in the thoughts, words or deeds of the Lord.
[...]
Having brushed aside doubts
about whether or not it could be done,
of your own free will you took
this helpless world under your protection.

You were kind without being asked,
you were loving without reason,
you were a friend to the stranger
and a kinsman to those without kin.
[...]
It was not fear of hell or desire for heaven
but utter purity of heart
that made you practise the good.

By always avoiding the crooked
and adhering to the straight,
you became the highest receptacle for purity.
[...]
By not envying the superior,
despising the inferior,
or competing with equals,
you attained pre-eminence in the world.

You were devoted to virtues for their own
sake, not for the rewards that come from them,
and thus due to your right progress
they have all come to completion within you.
Dhamma is against the stream of common thought, deep, subtle, difficult, delicate, unseen by passion’s slaves cloaked in the murk of ignorance. Vipassī Buddha
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Nicholas
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Re: Hymn to Buddha

Post by Nicholas »

Some from Conze's version:
How can there be a likeness to your virtues, untouched by foe or obstacle,
Everlasting, unlimited, and which cannot be surpassed?

There is only one thing which resembles you, O kindly one,
The jewel of the Dharma, by gaining which you won pre-eminence.

Without distinction all this world was bound to the defilements,
That you might free it you were long in bondage to compassion.

Which shall I praise first, you or the great compassion, by which
For so long you were held in Samsara, although you well knew its faults?

It was your compassion, given free course, which made you pass your time
Among the crowds, when the happiness of seclusion suited you so much better.

To praise you takes all guilt away, to recollect you lifts up the heart,
To seek you brings understanding, to comprehend you purity.

To approach you brings good fortune, to tend you the highest wisdom,
To resort to you takes away fear, to honour you is propitious.
Dhamma is against the stream of common thought, deep, subtle, difficult, delicate, unseen by passion’s slaves cloaked in the murk of ignorance. Vipassī Buddha
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Nicholas
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Re: Hymn to Buddha

Post by Nicholas »

In Praise of Speech

Well worded and significant, true and sweet,
deep or plain or both together, condensed or
copious. Hearing such words of yours, would not even
an opponent be convinced that you were all-knowing?

Generally your speech was wholly sweet
but when necessary it would be otherwise.
But either way, every word was well spoken
because it always achieved its purpose.

Soft or hard or possessing both qualities,
all your words when distilled had but one
taste - freedom.

They go to the hearts of all.
While comforting the grieving they alarm the
heedless and rouse those preoccupied with pleasures.

Truly your words are for all: they delight the wise,
strengthen those of middling intelligence
and illuminate the minds of the dull.

Your sayings coax men from false views
and draw them towards Nirvana.
They remove faults and rain down virtues.

Your knowledge embraces all things,
your mindfulness is ever present and
thus what you say will always come to pass.
Dhamma is against the stream of common thought, deep, subtle, difficult, delicate, unseen by passion’s slaves cloaked in the murk of ignorance. Vipassī Buddha
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Nicholas
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Re: Hymn to Buddha

Post by Nicholas »

In Praise of Compassion

You long bound yourself to compassion in order to free
all those in the world who were bound by defilements.

Which shall I praise first, you or the great compassion
by which you were long held in saṃsāra
though well you knew its faults?

Although you preferred the delights of solitude,
compassion led you to spend your time among the crowd.

Like a mighty dragon drawn from its lake by a spell,
compassion led you from forest to town
for the sake of those to be taught.

Though abiding in deep tranquillity, the development of
compassion made you take up even the musical art.

Your powers, your lion’s roar
and the manifestation of virtues are but glitter
rubbed off the nugget of your innate compassion.
Dhamma is against the stream of common thought, deep, subtle, difficult, delicate, unseen by passion’s slaves cloaked in the murk of ignorance. Vipassī Buddha
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