Bodhisattva Path

Using the Buddha’s teachings to preserve and enhance our well-being, as we engage with the world
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Nicholas
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Bodhisattva Path

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The source or heart of Mahayana is this Path leading to full buddhahood for self & others. This path arranged in stages is common in all varieties of Mahayana. One of the latest works is called Lamrim Year from the Lama Yeshe Wisdom Archives. Each page is a daily short practice for an entire year.
It is free, yet donations are helpful.

https://www.lamayeshe.com/article/lamrim-year
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Nicholas
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Re: Bodhisattva Path

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These are the contents giving the major topics covered:
Days 1–3 Introduction 1
Days 4–63 Guru Devotion 4
Days 64–86 The Perfect Human Rebirth 64
Days 87–113 Impermanence and Death 87
Days 114–134 The Lower Realms 114
Days 135–169 Refuge 135
Days 170–208 Karma 170
Days 209–238 The Sufferings of Samsara 209
Days 239–266 The Evolution of Samsara 239
Days 267–282 The Twelve Links of Dependent Origination 267
Days 283–339 Bodhicitta 283
Days 340–363 Emptiness 340
Days 364–365 Wrap-up 364

Appendices
The Foundation of All Good Qualities 367
Outline of Lamrim Topics 369
Suggested Further Reading
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Dharmasherab
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Re: Bodhisattva Path

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I wish an all encompassing Bodhisattva path from all schools of Buddhism can be put together so that they cross-cover for any gaps in any tradition. For example, Theravada Buddhism has the 10 Paramitas. There are also the texts like Cariyapitaka and Jataka stories which shows Bodhisattva qualities applied in the Buddha's past lives. In Mahayana Buddhism there are the Major and Minor Bodhisattva Precepts/Vows of two different types. I have come across different sets of Bodhisattva Precepts with overlaps with some minor differences between them. If all these aspects can be carefully studied and assembled together to make a more solid and structured Bodhisattva path it may increase the efficiency at which one travels the Bodhisattva Path.
“When one does not understand death, life can be very confusing.” - Ajahn Chah
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Nicholas
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Re: Bodhisattva Path

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Dharmasherab wrote: Fri Jul 02, 2021 3:53 pm I wish an all encompassing Bodhisattva path from all schools of Buddhism can be put together so that they cross-cover for any gaps in any tradition. For example, Theravada Buddhism has the 10 Paramitas. There are also the texts like Cariyapitaka and Jataka stories which shows Bodhisattva qualities applied in the Buddha's past lives. In Mahayana Buddhism there are the Major and Minor Bodhisattva Precepts/Vows of two different types. I have come across different sets of Bodhisattva Precepts with overlaps with some minor differences between them. If all these aspects can be carefully studied and assembled together to make a more solid and structured Bodhisattva path it may increase the efficiency at which one travels the Bodhisattva Path.
That would be of interest to scholarly folk, but doubt it is needed practically speaking. Ledi Sayadaw's Manual of the Excellent Man and Ācariya Dhammapāla's Treatise on the Pāramīs are a couple of non-Mahayana texts that give the basics of the bodhisatta path.

The main principle needed is the Will or aspiration & vow to become a buddha & assist others toward the same, over many lifetimes. The specific details of cultivation are less critical.
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Nicholas
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Re: Bodhisattva Path

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Right action and wrong action are determined by right thought and wrong
thought: right wisdom leads to right actions; wrong conceptions lead to wrong
actions. If we put the energy of the human body, speech and mind in the right
direction, it is so powerful. The problem is that our life has no direction and
that’s why our energy is fragmented. We must check up on how our life is right
now—does it have direction? If not, we’re wasting all the energy of our body,
speech and mind. Therefore, we need the discriminating knowledge-wisdom
to distinguish between right and wrong. In order to develop that, we have to
understand our mind and know how positive and negative minds arise. Since all
actions arise from the mind, without checking our mind, how can we determine
the nature of our actions?
Lama Yeshe, from Lamrim Year.
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Nicholas
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Re: Bodhisattva Path

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The guru is the antidote to the confused mind —Lama Yeshe

Why do we need a guru? Because in order to cure our diseased minds, we
need the help of someone who knows how to do it. Since it is extremely
difficult to understand how the mind works, we need the guidance of an expert
in this area. Furthermore, gaining liberation, or inner freedom, is not an easy
thing. Everything we have ever said or done on this trip we call life has had its
origin in the mind, and in the same way, the entire path to liberation and enlightenment
depends on the mind.

However, if we think of all our life’s experiences, how convinced are we that
they have all come from the mind? In order to really understand how this is
true, we need someone with the right kind of knowledge to explain it to us. In
other words, we need a guru. If we just think about this in a superficial way, we’ll
probably say to ourselves, “I know what I want; I know what my life’s about.” We
might think we know, but we really don’t. We think environmental pollution
comes from industry, but where does industry come from? It’s a creation of the
human mind. In the same way, all the world’s confusion—from that of societies
to that of the individual—is mind-created.

If people could simply imbue their minds with peaceful tranquility and loving
kindness, none of the world problems we see around us would arise. To achieve
this, we have to employ a method that brings that result. Since we don’t know
what such methods are or how to put them into practice, we need an experienced
teacher to show us that reality.
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Nicholas
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Re: Bodhisattva Path

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Je Tsongkhapa's Lamrim or Stages of the Path teachings are used all over Asia. Here are the topics in the new translation by Quarcoo of his Middle-Length Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment:
PRELIMINARIES
1. The Greatness of the Author
2. The Greatness of the Dharma
3. Listening to and Explaining the Dharma
4. Relying on a Teacher
5. The Meditation Session
6. The Freedoms and Endowments of This Life
7. The Paths of the Three Types of Persons
THE STAGES SHARED WITH PERSONS OF LESSER CAPACITY
8. Death and Future Lives
9. Refuge in the Three Jewels
10. Karma and Its Effects
THE STAGES SHARED WITH PERSONS OF MEDIUM CAPACITY
11. Suffering
Contemplating the Eight Types of Suffering
Contemplating the Six Types of Suffering
12. Mental Afflictions
13. Cyclic Existence and Liberation
THE STAGES OF PERSONS OF GREAT CAPACITY
14. Entering the Great Vehicle
15. The Sevenfold Instruction for Training in Bodhicitta
16. Equalizing and Exchanging Oneself and Others
The Ritual for Adopting Bodhicitta
17. Guarding One’s Bodhicitta
18. Training in the Perfections and Gathering Disciples
Generosity
Ethics
Patience
Joyous Effort
Meditative Stabilization
Wisdom
The Four Ways of Gathering Disciples
MEDITATIVE STABILIZATION AND WISDOM
19. Śamatha and Special Insight
20. The Practice of Śamatha
21. Accomplishing Śamatha
22. The Practice of Special Insight
23. The Selflessness of Persons
24. The Selflessness of Phenomena
25. The Two Truths
26. Uniting Śamatha and Special Insight
27. Conclusion
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Nicholas
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Re: Bodhisattva Path

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I suggest this one volume for study and practice. Here is one of many excellent reviews:
This is an excellent translation of Tsongkhapa’s Middle-Length Treatise (Lam rim ’bring ba), which sets out the way to skillfully progress through the stages of the path to enlightenment. This translation successfully conveys that Tsongkhapa is speaking not only to his fifteenth-century disciples but to us as well, more than six hundred years later. I am absolutely sure that this work offers us a key to concisely comprehend the profound and magnificent system of Tsongkhapa’s lam rim teaching.
– Kodo Yatsuya, professor, Komazawa University
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